Local Current Blog

Everything you need to know about the Alabama Shakes and Father John Misty show at Hall’s Island

Alabama Shakes (Photo by Pieter van Hallem) // Father John Misty (Photo by Nate Ryan/MPR)

This Saturday, the hot ticket in town is the big Alabama Shakes and Father John Misty show at Hall’s Island in Minneapolis—and not only is it one of the first big outdoor shows of the season, but it’ll be the first on this unique plot of land on the Mississippi River just north of downtown Minneapolis.

Since this will be a new experience for all 8,000 people in attendance, we thought we’d compile a list of tips for getting to the venue and what to expect once you arrive.

How to get there

Hall’s Island is located at on the east bank of the Mississippi, and is tucked underneath the recently refurbished Plymouth Avenue bridge. The closest intersection is Plymouth Ave. N. and Sibley St. NE.

There are multiple options for getting to Hall’s Island:

By bus: The concert’s promoters (JAM and First Avenue) have partnered with Metro Transit to offer stops near the concert from bus routes 11, 7, and 14. Find routes and schedules at Metro Transit’s site.

By bike: The promoters have also teamed up with Nice Ride, who will be offering on-site bike parking for their own rental bikes and personally owned bicycles. Bike parking will be located along the north end of the concert grounds (the blue line on the map below).

By your own car: There will be several small parking lots available for this event, and the promoters do stress that space is limited. Parking spots are available for purchase for $15, and it is recommended that purchases be made in advance.

By car2go: The short-term car rental company car2go will have a special drop-off site for their cars at 9th Ave. NE, just off Marshall St.

On foot: The promoters suggest using either the Plymouth Avenue bridge or the Hennepin Avenue bridge to enter from the west or downtown.

When to get there

This is an early show, with gates opening at 4:30 p.m. and music starting promptly at 6 p.m. Given how many people will be arriving at the venue for the first time, it’s probably a good idea to arrive as close to gates as possible in order to catch the beginning of Father John Misty’s set.

What is Hall’s Island, anyway?

Hall’s Island is a little slice of Minneapolis riverfront history. The actual island (which is not currently accessible to the public) was used as a bath house and park in the early 1900s, and from the 1960s to 2010 the whole stretch of land overlooking the island was owned by Scherer Bros. Lumber Company, who used it as a lumber yard.

Since reclaiming the land in 2010, the city has launched a massive 20-year RiverFirst plan to revamp the area and turn it back into usable park space. This Alabama Shakes and Father John Misty show will be the first event to bring the public back to this stretch of the riverfront—which just so happens to have a breathtaking up-close view of the downtown skyline.

What to bring

• Cash! The food and drink vendors are cash-only; as a back-up, there will be ATMs on site.
• Non-professional and disposable cameras are ok, as are small backpacks, small purses and fanny packs, and blankets.
• One factory sealed water bottle 1 L/32 oz. or less in size and/or one empty reusable bottle following the same size requirements will be permitted.

What to leave at home

• Lawn chairs
• Food and drink
• Balloons, flag poles, tables, any items to stake into the field
• Chains
• Coolers, glass bottles, cans, thermoses
• Large bags, backpacks, briefcases
• Pets (only service animals are permitted)
• Professional cameras, tripods, video cameras, recording devices
• Umbrellas
• Any item deemed by management to be dangerous or inappropriate

How to get in the mood

 

  • jennifer downham

    Another worthy note — the Minneapolis Parks Foundation is the non-profit benefactor of this show. Thank you First Ave and Minneapolis Park & Rec Board! @mplsparksfoundation

  • smittysmittybangbang

    Minneapolis rocks.

  • seanlien

    No umbrellas? Kinda random.

  • Pete

    Umbrellas make it hard for everybody behind you to see anything. Not really that random…